Saturday, 31 July 2021

Muammar Gaddafi’s son ‘back from the dead’ and planning political comeback



from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3lcXjMN

Meet The Quirky Alien Enemies In No More Heroes 3 - Nintendo Life

Meet The Quirky Alien Enemies In No More Heroes 3  Nintendo LifeView Full coverage on Google News

from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3zQ45MA

Trump: Bipartisan infrastructure bill will lead to 'massive socialist expansion'



from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3idi6Oj

Scarlett Johansson sues Disney over streaming of Black Widow - BBC News - BBC News

  1. Scarlett Johansson sues Disney over streaming of Black Widow - BBC News  BBC News
  2. Scarlett Johansson’s lawsuit against Disney could change Hollywood forever  The Independent
  3. Scarlett Johansson sues Disney over streaming of Black Widow  BBC News
  4. Scarlett Johansson suing Disney over Black Widow streaming release  The Guardian
  5. The Disney and Scarlett Johansson lawsuit could have big implications for the future of streaming  GamesRadar+
  6. View Full coverage on Google News


from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3l9NMGl

Death toll in wildfires that hit southern Turkey rises to four - The Independent

  1. Death toll in wildfires that hit southern Turkey rises to four  The Independent
  2. Turkey: Three dead in fires as authorities investigate causes of blazes - including possible sabotage  Sky News
  3. Wildfires raging across southern Turkey force residents to flee  Guardian News
  4. Turkish authorities investigate after wildfires leave three dead  ITV News
  5. Death toll in Turkish wildfires rises to four as tourists are evacuated  The Telegraph
  6. View Full coverage on Google News


from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3zQHvn1

Trump Pressed Justice Dept. to Declare Election Results Corrupt, Notes Show


By Katie Benner from NYT U.S. https://ift.tt/37eEVuA

UK politics news – live: New Cameron lobbying details emerge, while Tories receive £10m from developers - The Independent

  1. UK politics news – live: New Cameron lobbying details emerge, while Tories receive £10m from developers  The Independent
  2. David Cameron met vaccines minister shortly before award of contracts to company he advises  The Independent
  3. View Full coverage on Google News


from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3ygvmYf

Can Biden Finish What Obama Started And Close Down Guantanamo?

Nineteen years after he was captured in Afghanistan, and five years after a review board ruled he posed no threat to the United States, Abdul Latif Nasser was finally released this month from the U.S. military prison complex at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and repatriated to his native Morocco. He became the first prisoner transferred from the notorious detention facility in more than three years.

The move became the first real sign that there’s an effort underway to close Guantanamo. Since President Joe Biden came into office, however, administration officials at the Pentagon, State Department and National Security Council have quietly been working on a strategy to shutter the facility, built after the al-Qaeda attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Designed to detain individuals apprehended by the U.S. in its War on Terror, the prison has been become a costly and damaging quagmire for the U.S. government, once labeled by Amnesty International as the “gulag of our time.”
[time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”]

One of former President Barack Obama’s first orders in 2009 was to close the facility within a year; he failed. Now, twelve years later, his former Vice President is taking on the same arduous challenge that will require help from Congress and wholesale changes in the military commissions process.

After Nasser’s transfer, Guantanamo now houses just 39 inmates. Ten of them are already cleared for release, and 17 others are eligible for a periodic evaluation by a parole-like board about whether they, too, can be transferred. A dozen more high-value prisoners, including Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and other alleged plotters of the Sept. 11 attack, are set to remain at Guantanamo Bay until they are tried in military tribunals there. The Biden Administration wants to repatriate the detainees who have been cleared for release to foreign countries and work with Congress to lift current restrictions that block the remaining prisoners’ transfer to U.S. mainland facilities.

At the core of White House’s push to close Guantanamo is the desire to rein in the powers America wielded in the age of terrorism. It’s a chapter that Biden has indicated—at least outwardly—he would like to move beyond. The President has announced the U.S. military plans to withdraw all forces from Afghanistan by Aug. 31 and wrap up its combat mission in Iraq by year’s end. The Geneva Conventions and the international laws of war state that when a conflict is ended, prisoners detained pursuant to that conflict must be released and repatriated unless they’re charged with crimes.

Over the years, Guantanamo prisoners’ physical treatment and the U.S. government’s legal contortions to hold so many without charge have sparked international outcry from the United Nations, human rights organizations and the Cuban government, which complained that the territory was being used as a “concentration camp.” Of the roughly 780 people detained in Guantanamo since its establishment in 2002, many have been found to be non-combatants with no ties to either the Taliban or al-Qaeda, mistakenly apprehended or wrongfully turned over by anti-Taliban bounty hunters in Afghanistan. Just ten men at the prison today have cases dealing with war crimes, and only two have been tried, convicted and are now serving time.

The outcome of the Administration’s low-profile efforts to end this era is less than certain. Rather than delivering speeches or issuing mandates, Biden has worked behind-the-scenes to finish the work Obama started. The work of the Periodic Review Board, the parole-like board set up by the Obama Administration in 2011 to speed the process of transferring detainees out of Cuba, will continue under Biden to clear prisoners for release to foreign governments. The board helped Obama reduce the prisoner population from 245 to 41 detainees. Just one detainee was transferred out under former President Donald Trump, who issued an executive order to keep Guantanamo open indefinitely.

Biden has thus far rebuffed requests by Democratic senators to reestablish Obama-era offices at the State and Defense departments, which were dismantled by the Trump Administration, tasked with the singular mission to close Guantanamo. He’s also chosen not to name a Special Envoy to negotiate the transfer of prisoners to foreign countries. Instead diplomats in U.S. embassies across the globe, under the leadership of State’s Bureau of Counterterrorism, are working to repatriate the detainees cleared for release. “The Biden administration will apply all the necessary diplomatic resources to facilitate the transfer of detainees found eligible,” a senior administration told reporters on July 19.

After the detainees cleared for repatriation are transferred elsewhere, the White House will have to persuade Congress to bring the remaining prisoners on the U.S. mainland. That will be far more daunting task. Ten men are currently awaiting legal action through military commissions authorized by the Bush Administration, which is a costly and painfully slow process that—at its current pace—will keep Guantanamo open for years. But bringing the detainees to the U.S. is fraught with challenges on everything from where the detainees can be tried in court to where they can be imprisoned.

The biggest hurdle to moving those remaining detainees is legal. For a decade, Congress has included language in every Defense bill that forbids Guantanamo prisoners from coming stateside, citing the threat they might pose. The White House’s selling-point to the GOP, many of whom backed Trump’s order to keep the prison open, is that it currently costs about $140 million a year to keep the detention facility open along with assigning 1,500 personnel to run it. That breaks down to more than $3 million per prisoner per year—a price tag that will assuredly rise as more aging detainees require geriatric care.

Biden is now the fourth U.S. president that human rights groups have pushed to close Guantanamo. In January, as Biden prepared to take office, Amnesty International released a report documenting human rights violations perpetrated against those detained at the camp, including torture, inadequate medical care and the absence of fair trials. “These are detentions that are inescapably bound up with multiple layers of unlawful government conduct over the years – secret transfers, incommunicado interrogations, forced feeding of hunger strikers, torture, enforced disappearance, and a complete lack of due process,” said Daphne Eviatar, director of the nonprofit’s security with human rights program.

Mark Maher, a lawyer at Reprieve U.S., an international human rights organization that represents five detainees at Guantanamo, said he’s encouraged that the Biden Administration is revitalizing the processes to close the facility. “What is important for the Administration to do is to solve the easy cases—those people who aren’t charged and never will be charged with the crime and never will face trial,” he said.

Before his release, Nasser, 56, was among Guantanamo’s longest serving prisoners. Having been detained as an “enemy combatant” in 2002, he was taken to Guantanamo not long after it was established. And yet, despite two decades of incarceration, the U.S. government failed to demonstrate exactly why it upended Nasser’s life. He was never charged with a crime. He never had a trial.

“It sounds awful, but his case isn’t even that unique. There are many people who have been there for 14 to 19 years,” said Maher, who served as one of Nasser’s lawyers. “Do we as Americans really think that people should be held in prison—on an island thousands of miles away from their families—without any opportunity to stand up in a real trial and challenge the reasons for their detention, possibly for the rest of their life?”



from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/2WxKKkR

Four vaccinated adults, two unvaccinated children test positive for COVID on Royal Caribbean ship



from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3iYcmas

Driver shortage crisis threatens UK milk deliveries in wake of Brexit and Covid - The Guardian

Driver shortage crisis threatens UK milk deliveries in wake of Brexit and Covid  The GuardianView Full coverage on Google News

from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/2UY0XQ8

Amazon hit with record $886m fine - live updates - Telegraph.co.uk

Amazon hit with record $886m fine - live updates  Telegraph.co.uk

from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3zOnc9K

Amazon hit with $886m fine for alleged data breach

The tech giant rejects claims it has broken European Union data protection laws.

from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/376WPzy

BMX double helps power Team GB to six more Olympic medals - The Guardian

  1. BMX double helps power Team GB to six more Olympic medals  The Guardian
  2. Tokyo Olympics: Bethany Shriever & Kye Whyte win historic medals in BMX racing  BBC Sport
  3. BMX: GB's Bethany Shriever storms to gold | Tokyo Olympics  BBC Sport
  4. BBC Olympics: Peckham BMX club 'proud' of Olympic hero Kye Whyte after silver medal  My London
  5. Bethany Shriever CROWDFUND her way to Tokyo. Now she's the BMX OLYMPIC CHAMPION! | Tokyo Olympics  BBC
  6. View Full coverage on Google News


from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/2V6FPa7

Facebook, Google expect jabs for office return

The tech companies will require vaccination for returning in-office employees as Covid-19 cases rise in US

from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3lbLAho

The Crown series 5: FIRST LOOK at Imelda Staunton as Queen Elizabeth II in the Netflix drama - Daily Mail

  1. The Crown series 5: FIRST LOOK at Imelda Staunton as Queen Elizabeth II in the Netflix drama  Daily Mail
  2. The Crown floors fans with first photo of Imelda Staunton as the Queen  HELLO!
  3. The Crown season 5: First look at Imelda Staunton’s Queen Elizabeth II  Metro.co.uk
  4. Here's The First Look At Imelda Staunton As The Queen In "The Crown"  BuzzFeed News
  5. ‘The Crown’: First Look at Imelda Staunton as Queen Elizabeth II in Season 5  Variety
  6. View Full coverage on Google News


from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/2V4wvni

Man pleads guilty to assault after Chris Whitty accosted in London park - The Guardian

  1. Man pleads guilty to assault after Chris Whitty accosted in London park  The Guardian
  2. Estate agent filmed getting England's chief medical officer Chris Whitty in a headlock pleads guilty  Daily Mail
  3. Prof Chris Whitty: Man pleads guilty to park assault  BBC News
  4. Chris Whitty attack: Estate agent admits to St James's Park assault  Metro.co.uk
  5. 24-year-old pleads guilty to assaulting Chris Whitty in central London  Key 103
  6. View Full coverage on Google News


from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3l9Ycpv

Senate Democrats reportedly 'booed' Joe Manchin for mentioning the deficit at a luncheon



from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3rJZ7OL

Monzo under investigation by FCA over anti-money laundering rules - The Guardian

  1. Monzo under investigation by FCA over anti-money laundering rules  The Guardian
  2. FCA probes UK bank Monzo over potential money laundering breaches  Financial Times
  3. Monzo investigated over possible money laundering breaches | Business  The Times
  4. Monzo faces FCA money laundering probe  Telegraph.co.uk
  5. Monzo losses grow as it faces investigation by the FCA for financial crime breaches  AltFi
  6. View Full coverage on Google News


from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3zMY576

Covid symptoms change by age and gender - check the most likely signs for you - Wales Online

Covid symptoms change by age and gender - check the most likely signs for you  Wales OnlineView Full coverage on Google News

from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3ff1L9V

Two crew killed in attack on Israeli-managed tanker off Oman - Al Jazeera English

  1. Two crew killed in attack on Israeli-managed tanker off Oman  Al Jazeera English
  2. Israeli-operated oil tanker attacked off of Oman  Daily Mail
  3. Oman: UK crew member among two killed in attack on oil tanker  Metro.co.uk
  4. Two reportedly killed in attack on Israeli-linked oil tanker off Oman  The Guardian
  5. UK oil worker dead as Israeli ship attacked off coast of Oman  Daily Express
  6. View Full coverage on Google News


from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3ys3xMN

Michael Che under fire after sharing shocking joke about Simone Biles



from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3j3sZRZ

‘Brighton cat killer’ jailed for stabbing 16 pets in string of night-time attacks - The Independent

  1. ‘Brighton cat killer’ jailed for stabbing 16 pets in string of night-time attacks  The Independent
  2. Brighton cat killer jailed for five years  Sky News
  3. 'Brighton cat killer' Steven Bouquet jailed for stabbing 16 pets  BBC News
  4. Brighton cat killer jailed for five years for stabbing 16 cats  Brighton and Hove News
  5. Brighton cat killer jailed for more than five years  Evening Standard
  6. View Full coverage on Google News


from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3BYL9wX

Again? Faulty exchange does in US in Olympic mixed relay



from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3rQczR1

Friday, 30 July 2021

UK Covid live: 31,117 new cases as research suggests vaccines have prevented 60,000 deaths in England - The Guardian

UK Covid live: 31,117 new cases as research suggests vaccines have prevented 60,000 deaths in England  The Guardian

from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3iYi7VD

Covid vaccines have prevented 60,000 deaths in England - Jonathan Van-Tam - BBC News

  1. Covid vaccines have prevented 60,000 deaths in England - Jonathan Van-Tam  BBC News
  2. Heartbroken mum of Covid vaccine sceptic who died of the virus urges people to get jabbed  The Mirror
  3. Heartbreaking picture of dad 34 who died from covid  Staffordshire Live
  4. ‘I wish I’d had jab’: Father who refused vaccine dies of Covid  The Independent
  5. Virus victim Matthew Keenan’s mother in emotinal vaccines appeal – The Yorkshire Post says  The Yorkshire Post
  6. View Full coverage on Google News


from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/374YpSF

Capitol officer Harry Dunn responds to right-wing attacks: ‘Can’t put Band-Aid on my emotions’



from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3l7Uhcy

RNLI sees 2,000% daily increase in donations after criticism of asylum rescues in Channel - The Independent

  1. RNLI sees 2,000% daily increase in donations after criticism of asylum rescues in Channel  The Independent
  2. Boris Johnson news – live: Raab claims approach to Channel crossings ‘consistent’ with RNLI migrant rescues  The Independent
  3. The RNLI is saving lives at sea. Terrible, isn’t it, Nigel Farage?  The Independent
  4. View Full coverage on Google News


from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3f9gcfS

Trump slams McConnell for 'weak' leadership and blames 'RINOs' for 'ruining America'



from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/376BG8u

Lawmakers demand NBA players cut ties with Chinese firms accused of "human slavery"



from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/2UTRuJC

GOP senator unflinchingly defends officer who shot Ashli Babbitt in tense exchange with radio caller



from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3ldNrlV

Big 12 reportedly plans to make leaving ‘as difficult as possible’ for Texas, Oklahoma



from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3zFPYtc

It’s All Fun and Games: 11 High-Design Lawn Games to Maximize Your Summer



from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3iHuHXv

Doctor Who: Jodie Whittaker and Chris Chibnall to leave in 2022 - BBC News

  1. Doctor Who: Jodie Whittaker and Chris Chibnall to leave in 2022  BBC News
  2. Jodie Whittaker confirms she is leaving Doctor Who and will bow out in 2022  Daily Mail
  3. Jodie Whittaker will leave Doctor Who, BBC confirms  The Guardian
  4. Jodie Whittaker to quit Doctor Who  The Telegraph
  5. Doctor Who: Jodie Whittaker, the show's first female lead, will leave TV drama next year  Sky News
  6. View Full coverage on Google News


from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3zPKf3U

Lewis Hamilton and Sebastian Vettel speak out over Hungary anti-LGBTQ+ law - BBC Sport

  1. Lewis Hamilton and Sebastian Vettel speak out over Hungary anti-LGBTQ+ law  BBC Sport
  2. Red Bull's Lewis Hamilton penalty review request to be heard by British GP stewards ahead of Hungarian GP  Sky Sports
  3. Betting odds for the Hungarian GP – Will Hamilton take a record 9th Hungaroring win?  Formula 1 RSS UK
  4. Lewis Hamilton: Six of the best as world champion eyes 100 wins  Bangkok Post
  5. Lewis Hamilton voices support for Hungary's LGBTQ+ community in Instagram post ahead of Hungarian Grand Prix  Sky Sports
  6. View Full coverage on Google News


from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/3iTFAqM

Here Are the 11 New Books You Should Read in August

A crop of fresh books arriving in August offers something for every reader, from tennis legend Billie Jean King’s autobiography to Helen Hoang’s latest swoony love story. August welcomes the return of veterans like Deborah Levy and Hilma Wolitzer and ushers in fiction debuts from Anthony Veasna So and poet Honorée Fanonne Jeffers. There’s an innovative thriller, heartbreaking short story collections, a comprehensive account of the history of white feminism and more. Here, the 11 new books to read this month.

Radiant Fugitives, Nawaaz Ahmed (August 3)

[time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”]

Three generations’ worth of family secrets come to an astounding head in Nawaaz Ahmed’s debut novel Radiant Fugitives. Set in the early days of the Obama administration, the story centers on Seema, a Muslim Indian political activist, whose pregnancy with her first child leads her to reconnect with her estranged family amid a swiftly changing cultural landscape. In the span of just a week, Seema, her mother, and her sister confront a lifetime of tensions and unspoken desires before they welcome a new life into their brood.

Buy Now: Radiant Fugitives on Bookshop | Amazon

All’s Well, Mona Awad (August 3)

College theater director Miranda Fitch is losing her grip on just about everything in her life. She’s consumed by chronic back pain following an acting accident that ruined her marriage, her career and left her dependent on painkillers. And now her current job is on the line, and Miranda decides to stage a production of the same Shakespeare play that put her in this precarious position, All’s Well That Ends Well. The appearance of three strangers that are far too familiar with Miranda’s past—and offer her a dangerously appealing deal to secure a better future—complicate Miranda’s mission. What ensues in the latest novel from the author of Bunny is a darkly hilarious journey into the psyche of a woman approaching her breaking point.

Buy Now: All’s Well on Bookshop | Amazon

The Husbands, Chandler Baker (August 3)

Can women ever really have it all? The question propels Chandler Baker’s latest page-turner, which follows an attorney named Nora Sprangler who is struggling to balance her successful career and the needs of her growing family. Everything changes when the Spranglers move to Dynasty Ranch, an exclusive suburban enclave where ambitious women are married to men who happily share the domestic duties. There, Nora is asked to help with a neighbor’s wrongful death case, setting in motion a series of startling revelations about her new community. The Husbands, set to be adapted into a film starring Kristen Wiig, is an unsettling portrait of marriage, motherhood and love.

Buy Now: The Husbands on Bookshop | Amazon

Holdout, Jeffrey Kluger (August 3)

In TIME editor-at-large Jeffrey Kluger’s Holdout, astronaut Walli Beckwith has devoted her entire career to excelling at space travel, but she soon finds that her most pressing concern is an urgent and time-sensitive issue on earth. After a freak accident necessitates that Walli and her colleagues leave the International Space Station where they work, she sees a golden—if risky—opportunity to make a case for the kind of change she’d like to see earthside in this action-packed thriller of a novel.

Buy Now: Holdout on Bookshop | Amazon

Afterparties: Stories, Anthony Veasna So (August 3)

In his posthumous debut collection of short stories, Afterparties: Stories, Anthony Veasna So captures the challenges and triumphs of a close-knit community of Cambodian Americans living in Southern California in the shadow of genocide. Marked by sharp wit and overwhelming in the scope of emotions they portray, So’s vignettes offer a nuanced and compassionate view of the rich and complex experiences of a group of immigrants who dared to build new lives in an often unforgiving country. The collection is a true testament to So’s strength as a writer—and its publication is bittersweet in light of his untimely death last winter at the age of 28, a taste of a singular talent gone far too soon.

Buy Now: Afterparties on Bookshop | Amazon

Against White Feminism: Notes on Disruption, Rafia Zakaria (August 17)

The history of feminism has long been dominated by a white and Western narrative, presenting a liberatory movement for white women, at the expense of women around the world who are Black, Indigenous and people of color. In Against White Feminism, attorney and political philosopher Rafia Zakaria presents a clear-eyed analysis of the harrowing true impact of white feminism when it comes to upholding colonial, patriarchal, capitalist and white supremacist structures. Delving into issues that run the gamut from the often problematic nature of foreign aid to the complicated politics of sexual liberation, Zakaria offers an expansive and intersectional critique of white feminism while envisioning a more inclusive future for all.

Buy Now: Against White Feminism on Bookshop | Amazon

The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois, Honorée Fanonne Jeffers (August 24)

Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, National Book Award long-listed poet, makes her fiction debut with The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois, a vibrant and tender coming-of-age novel. Ailey Pearl Garfield is a young girl reckoning with what it means to be a Black woman in America as she teeters on the precipice of adulthood. While she negotiates her place in the world, Ailey travels through time and space to explore her family’s history, from their enslavement in the Georgia town of Chicasetta to their lingering generational trauma in the present day. Ailey’s time-traveling journey features complex and intimate narratives of love and heartbreak from her family’s two centuries in the American South, giving her not only insight into her family’s complicated past, but also the tools to imagine her own future.

Buy Now: The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois on Bookshop | Amazon

All In: An Autobiography, Billie Jean King (August 17)

Tennis champion Billie Jean King reflects on her life and trailblazing career in her new autobiography. All In traces everything from King’s experiences with sexism in sports to her work in the LGBTQ rights movement to her iconic win in the 1973 “Battle of the Sexes” match against Bobby Riggs. Throughout, King describes the challenges she faced and the issues she continues to fight for in urgent and vivid terms, coalescing into a powerful self-portrait of an inspiring athlete and activist.

Buy Now: All In on Bookshop | Amazon

Real Estate: A Living Autobiography, Deborah Levy (August 24)

The spaces we occupy can speak volumes about the lives we seek to live and the people we are—and hope to become. At least, that’s the case that Deborah Levy makes in Real Estate, the third and final installation in her lauded Living Autobiography memoir series. In Levy’s trademark incisive prose, she meditates on both the literal and conceptual facets of home, property and living. Sparkling with humor and Levy’s zest for life, it’s a read for everyone who understands that home, though always familiar, can be found in the most unexpected of places.

Buy Now: Real Estate on Bookshop | Amazon

The Heart Principle, Helen Hoang (August 31)

Anna Sun is a burnt-out violinist who falls for the most unexpected suitor in Helen Hoang’s dazzling new romance. After Anna’s longterm boyfriend suggests they open their relationship, she decides to pursue a one-night stand with a motorcycle-riding man who couldn’t be less her type. But the heroine’s determination to keep it casual begins to dissolve as their fling turns into something much more. Sensitive and sweet, The Heart Principle—a worthy follow-up to Hoang’s 2019 novel The Bride Test—explores a burgeoning romance built on undeniable chemistry.

Buy Now: The Heart Principle on Bookshop | Amazon

Today a Woman Went Mad in the Supermarket: Stories, Hilma Wolitzer (August 31)

In her latest collection of short stories, Hilma Wolitzer, the 91-year-old fiction writer and mother of novelist Meg Wolitzer, explores the quiet and sometimes devastating moments that accompany marriage. Today a Woman Went Mad in the Supermarket, which includes many stories that were first published in the 1960s and 70s, features narratives like the evolving relationship between Paulie and Howard as they navigate parenthood, growing up and growing old. The result is a timeless examination of the bonds that connect us and the staying power of love.

Buy Now: Today a Woman Went Mad in the Supermarket on Bookshop | Amazon



from RSSMix.com Mix ID 13001087 https://ift.tt/2WzLeHi

The Last, Painful Days of Anthony Bourdain

By Kim Severson from NYT Food https://ift.tt/9KvPtxI

start entrepreneur online - how to start entrepreneur online